Guemes Fire Home Page








KEEP CLEAR OF DOWNED TREES & POWER LINES!
With the high winds and increased precipitation we've had lately, there is an increased chance for branches and trees to fall and impact power lines or poles.  
Stay clear and DO NOT try to remedy the situation without proper protective gear and tools.
Call 911 immediately and advise the dispatcher of the location so that Fire Department and PSE crews can respond.
                                                    


When should you call 911 for a medical emergency?  Check out these Frequently Asked Questions.

                                                    


          The Guemes Island Fire Department is a volunteer organization dedicated to providing the best possible medical and fire emergency response services to the people of Guemes Island, Washington.  Located in the San Juan Islands, Guemes Island is just north of Anacortes across the Guemes Channel.  The island is served by a small ferry operated by Skagit County.  GIFD provides basic life support response and care with a modern ambulance and  a team of ten  emergency medical technicians.  Advanced life support response is provided by Anacortes Fire Department.  With two pumpers, a tanker and brush rig, GIFD is equipped to handle everything from wildland fires to complex structure fires.







 

You Should Know...

Guemes Connects
Emergency Medical Information Forms

Guemes Connects is spearheading an effort to make your medical information readily available to EMS responders.  Knowledge about your medications and health related conditions can make all the difference in the quality of care responders can provide.  For more information check out the Guemes Connects programs.



I C E - IN CASE OF EMERGENCY

The concept of 'ICE' is catching on quickly.  It is a method of contact for EMS personnel to use during emergency situations.  As cell(mobile) phones are carried by the majority of the population, all you need to do is store the number of the person or persons who you wish to have contacted during an emergency under the name 'ICE' (In Case Of Emergency).

The idea was thought up by a paramedic who found that when he went to the scene of an accident, there were often mobile phones with patients, but responders didn't know which number(s) to call.  He thought it would be a good idea if there was a nationally recognized system for this purpose.  In an emergency situation, EMS personnel and hospital staff are able to quickly contact the right person by simply dialing the number(s) you have stored as 'ICE.'  For more than one contact name, simply enter ICE1, ICE2 and ICE3 etc.  A great idea that will make a difference!




  


Department News


        

Go to the campaign Website by clicking the image above and learn more about how heart attacks affect women.
Make the Call. Don't Miss a Beat. 

     Although women often think of heart attack as something that affects mainly men, heart disease is the number one killer of women. Every 90 seconds, a woman in the United States has a heart attack. Sadly, research shows that only half of women indicated they would call 9-1-1 had they known they were having a heart attack. Even worse, fewer were aware of the most common symptoms. This new campaign by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office on Women's Health has been developed to help women understand the most common symptoms of a heart attack, and to encourage them to call 9-1-1 should they experience any one of them.



Fire Department Acquires the Jaws of Life


Following a successful fund raising campaign the Guemes Island Fire Department has purchase the Jaws of Life and is in the process of putting these life saving tools into service.  The fund raising campaign was coordinated by Lori Stamper.  Originally conceived as her Senior Project, (a required activity for all Anacortes High School graduates), the campaign continued through December, 2011.  While the goal $25,000 was not attained, the campaign raised just under $15,000.
When it became clear the fund raising effort would fall short of the total needed to purchase new equipment, Lieutenant Tom Fouts stepped in.  He began to look for used gear and eventually found tools that had been used for demonstration purposes by one of the department’s oldest fire equipment suppliers, L. N. Curtis in Seattle.  Tom negotiated a great deal and the department acquired a complete set of Hurst hydraulic tools and a Honda powered pump.  These tools have been used lightly for training and demonstration purposes and are in great shape.  The department put up $3,000 from the regular budget to purchase Rescue 42 automobile  stabilization gear to help ensure safety for victims and firefighters at motor vehicle accident scenes.
The new gear is now in service and is being carried on the department’s ambulance.  Firefighters are working with the equipment and will participate in focused training over the coming months.  In mid-February L. N. Curtis will provide hands on training with an emphasis on the characteristics of the Hurst tools.
While the formal fund raising campaign has ended, the department will continue to welcome donations to help defray the cost of the stabilization gear.  “We are so thankful to everyone who provided much needed support to allow us to purchase the Jaws of life.” said Chief Stamper, “It is a relief to know we have the tools to rapidly extricate victims pinned in wrecked cars and get them on the way to the hospital as quickly as possible.”






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